Pupil Premium

Eligibility and funding amounts

The pupil premium grant is funding provided to schools to close the attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers. A school will receive an amount of money for each pupil of compulsory school age who fits the eligibility criteria. There are five categories of eligible pupil. Each category attracts a different amount of funding.

Allocation

The grant is allocated in line with the financial year, which begins in April. Each year’s allocations are based on data from the previous January’s census. If an eligible pupil joins after the January census, the school will not receive pupil premium funding for his/her until the following year. Maintained schools receive the pupil premium through their local authority (LA), whereas the Education Funding Agency allocates the funding directly to academies and free schools. Both academies and maintained schools receive the grant in quarterly instalments. However, pupil premium funding for looked-after children (LAC) is not allocated to schools but to the virtual school head in the LA, who will work with the school to decide how it will be spent.

 

Spending the grant

The grant can be spent as each school sees fit, as long as it is used to demonstrably improve the attainment of eligible pupils. Schools do not need to spend an equal amount on each pupil, or use the money for interventions that benefit only eligible pupils. However the grant should not be used to fund free school meals, as schools already receive funding for this through the dedicated schools grant.

Publishing information about pupil premium spending Schools must publish information on their websites about the amount of pupil premium funding they have received, how it will be used, how the previous year’s allocation was spent, and the effect of this expenditure on the attainment of eligible pupils.

Further information:

“Your school helps pupils to become
confident rounded young people.”

Ofsted

“Pupils talked to us about the way in which you
and your staff celebrate difference and help to make everyone feel valued.”

Ofsted

“The most striking aspect of your school is the way in which you plan to support pupils’ individual needs.”

Ofsted

“Once at school, the life coach works with
individuals to help them to deal with any anxieties that they may have.”

Ofsted

“You seek to identify any triggers which cause pupils to behave erratically and you work towards eliminating these.”

Ofsted

“Teaching at your school is characterised by positive relationships between members of staff and pupils.”

Ofsted

“Pupils are given chances to reflect upon this
through ‘life books’ where observations are made, and improvements praised.”

Ofsted

“The systems and structures that you have put in place ensure that pupils feel safe at school.”

Ofsted

“Pupils at your school feel safe.”

Ofsted

“A time of ‘reflection’ at the end of the
day allows pupils to consider how they have performed at school and helps them to focus on their attitudes and behaviours. ”

Ofsted

“All pupils benefit from targets to help them to develop their social and emotional skills and to build a level of resilience.”

Ofsted

“Teachers consider
pupils’ emotional well-being deeply and give them space when they need to refocus.”

Ofsted

“Pupils told inspectors that they really value the way in which they feel respected at your school.”

Ofsted

“Teachers and teaching assistants work hard to ensure that pupils are ‘nudged’ in the right direction in lessons.”

Ofsted

“Pupils welcome new arrivals with understanding and compassion.”

Ofsted

“Before coming to
school, you and other leaders work hard to understand the needs of individual
pupils.”

Ofsted

“The work of the
life coach can include one-to-one work in addition to positive thinking strategies,
mindfulness and aromatherapy.”

Ofsted

“Inspectors saw first-hand the way in which your staff spoke to pupils with compassion and respect.”

Ofsted

“A time of ‘reflection’ at the end of the
day allows pupils to consider how they have performed at school and helps them to focus on their attitudes and behaviours. ”

Ofsted

“Pupils make strides socially and emotionally.”

Ofsted

“Within classrooms, teachers reward positive behaviours consistently.”

Ofsted

“An SEMH curriculum runs through the heart of your school.”

Ofsted

“Pupils value the way in which you and your
staff make everyone feel included.”

Ofsted

“In classrooms, pupils focus hard and respond well to any advice and guidance that is given to them.”

Ofsted