Careers

Gatsby Benchmark

The eight Gatsby Benchmarks are the framework for good career guidance developed to support schools in providing students with the best possible careers education, information, advice, and guidance which we are implementing at Venn Boulevard Centre.

Every school and college should have an embedded programme of career education and guidance that is known and understood by pupils, parents, teachers and employers.

The careers programme should be published on the school’s website in a way that enables pupils, parents, teachers and employers to access and understand it.

The programme should be regularly evaluated with feedback as part of the evaluation programme. 

By the age of 14, pupils should have accessed and used information about career paths and the labour market to inform their own decisions on study options. 

Parents should be encouraged to access and use the information about labour markets and future study options to inform their support to their children. 

A school’s career programme should actively seek to challenge stereotypical thinking and raise aspirations Schools should keep systematic records of the individual advice given to each pupil and subsequent agreed decisions.

All pupils should have access to these records to support their career development.  Schools should collect and maintain accurate data for each pupil on their education, training or employment destinations for at least 3 years after they leave the school. 

All teachers should link curriculum learning with careers.

For example, STEM subject teachers should highlight the relevance of STEM subjects for a wide range of future career paths.

Every pupil should have multiple opportunities to learn from employers about work, employment and the skills that are valued in the workplace.

This can be through a range of enrichment activities including visiting speakers, mentoring and enterprise schemes.

Every pupil should have first-hand experiences of the workplace through work visits, work shadowing and/or work experience to help their exploration of career opportunities, and expand their networks.

There should be at least one experience by the age of 16 and a subsequent one by the age of 18.

By the age of 16, every pupil should have had a meaningful encounter with providers of the full range of learning opportunities, including 6th forms, colleges, universities and apprenticeship providers.

This should include the opportunity to meet both staff and pupils.  By the age of 18 all pupils who are considering applying for university should have had at least 2 visits to universities to meet staff and pupils. 

Every pupil should have opportunities for guidance interviews with a careers adviser, who could be internal (a member of school staff) or external, provided they are trained to an appropriate level.

These should be available whenever significant study or career choices are being made. They should be expected for all pupils but should be timed to meet their individual needs.

“Pupils value the way in which you and your
staff make everyone feel included.”

Ofsted

“Pupils told inspectors that they really value the way in which they feel respected at your school.”

Ofsted

“Pupils talked to us about the way in which you
and your staff celebrate difference and help to make everyone feel valued.”

Ofsted

“Inspectors saw first-hand the way in which your staff spoke to pupils with compassion and respect.”

Ofsted

“An SEMH curriculum runs through the heart of your school.”

Ofsted

“Before coming to
school, you and other leaders work hard to understand the needs of individual
pupils.”

Ofsted

“Within classrooms, teachers reward positive behaviours consistently.”

Ofsted

“In classrooms, pupils focus hard and respond well to any advice and guidance that is given to them.”

Ofsted

“A time of ‘reflection’ at the end of the
day allows pupils to consider how they have performed at school and helps them to focus on their attitudes and behaviours. ”

Ofsted

“A time of ‘reflection’ at the end of the
day allows pupils to consider how they have performed at school and helps them to focus on their attitudes and behaviours. ”

Ofsted

“Once at school, the life coach works with
individuals to help them to deal with any anxieties that they may have.”

Ofsted

“Pupils welcome new arrivals with understanding and compassion.”

Ofsted

“The work of the
life coach can include one-to-one work in addition to positive thinking strategies,
mindfulness and aromatherapy.”

Ofsted

“All pupils benefit from targets to help them to develop their social and emotional skills and to build a level of resilience.”

Ofsted

“Pupils at your school feel safe.”

Ofsted

“Your school helps pupils to become
confident rounded young people.”

Ofsted

“The most striking aspect of your school is the way in which you plan to support pupils’ individual needs.”

Ofsted

“You seek to identify any triggers which cause pupils to behave erratically and you work towards eliminating these.”

Ofsted

“Teaching at your school is characterised by positive relationships between members of staff and pupils.”

Ofsted

“Teachers consider
pupils’ emotional well-being deeply and give them space when they need to refocus.”

Ofsted

“Pupils are given chances to reflect upon this
through ‘life books’ where observations are made, and improvements praised.”

Ofsted

“The systems and structures that you have put in place ensure that pupils feel safe at school.”

Ofsted

“Pupils make strides socially and emotionally.”

Ofsted

“Teachers and teaching assistants work hard to ensure that pupils are ‘nudged’ in the right direction in lessons.”

Ofsted